Rosé Is Here to Stay

Rosé Is Here to Stay

With the launch of so many new rosé wines leading up to summer, we think it’s safe to say that rosé is here to stay. From Trader Joe’s to Jon Bon Jovi, it seems like everyone is either drinking rosé or making it themselves.

Drink rosé on its own, or use it as a mixer. We found six delicious ways to enjoy this trendy wine that’s perfect for summer.

What Is Rosé, Anyway?

Contrary to what some might assume, pink wines aren’t made by mixing red and white. Instead, pink wines are made with red wine grapes. The skins of the grapes are only in contact with the juice for a short time. This brief period imparts a paler color to the wine, as well as a lighter taste. White Zinfandel wines are made in the same way as rosés, but they are sweeter. Rosé wines are typically drier and more acidic.

Rosé wines are made using four different methods, in order of the quality of wine produced: saignée, pressé, maceration, and run off. Maceration is the most commonly used method.

Rosé wines are made using four different methods, in order of the quality of wine produced: saignée, pressé, maceration, and run off. Saignée and pressé are the most involved and time-consuming methods, which use pressure to obtain juice. Maceration is more common and less labor-intensive. Grape skins and juice sit together only long enough to obtain the desired color. The run off method uses a by-product of making red wine to create rosé as well, but the quality is on the low side.

If you’re drinking rosé on its own, choose a higher quality bottle. But if you’re mixing it with other ingredients, it doesn’t need to be top quality. For rosés worth drinking that won’t break the bank, refer to this list from Delish.

Rosé + Tequila

Start with this recipe from Half Baked Harvest. It makes a full pitcher of sangria to share. Combine rosé, tequila, lime juice, and agave with fresh seasonal fruit, including peaches, blueberries, and strawberries. Top it with sparkling water for fizz. Perfect for a summer gathering with friends.

Rosé + Gin

We featured a basil gimlet recipe previously, but we want to give this recipe from Food 52 a try too. Mix one part gin to two parts rosé, along with lime juice and simple syrup. The recipe makes a single serving, but scale it up to make a full pitcher for sharing. Don’t forget the martini glasses.

Rosé + Rum

Rum is another liquor that’s a hallmark of summer, and mojitos are another trend that isn’t going anywhere. This recipe from Garnish With Lemon makes a pitcher of mojitos using sparkling rosé, light rum, simple syrup, strawberries, limes, and mint. Consider making a batch of infused simple syrup with mint leaves — great for adding to iced tea also.

If you’re drinking rosé on its own, choose a higher quality bottle. But if you’re mixing it with other ingredients, it doesn’t need to be top quality.

Rosé + Vodka

This cocktail from The Bojon Gourmet packs quite a punch, with vodka, sparkling rosé, and elderflower liqueur, along with fresh grapefruit juice. Like the Rosé Gimlet recipe above, you can scale the quantities to make a full pitcher. Alanna calls for rosé vodka in her recipe, which is made by Hangar 1. If you’re searching for elderflower liqueur, ask for St-Germain at a well-stocked liquor store.

Rosé + Liqueur

We’re waiting for a special occasion to make this elegant recipe from Justine Celina. Combine rosé with lychee liqueur, elderflower syrup, lemon sparkling water, and plain sparkling water. Then add peaches and strawberries, with lemon wedges for a garnish. Justine recommends IKEA as a source for elderflower syrup, and a good liquor store will have lychee liqueur. If you’ve never had them before, lychees are a sweet stone fruit native to China.

Rosé + Lemonade

Finally, if you want to sip an adult beverage without fear of accidentally overindulging, try this recipe from Crazy For Crust. Dorothy mixes rosé with club soda and pink lemonade for a tart, bubbly pitcher of refreshment that won’t knock you out. Just don’t drink it all yourself.